65. Berlinale – 600 milas (2015), Prins (2015), Forbidden Room (2015)

600 Miles, Directed by Gabriel Ripstein

Very realistic, great action scenes, full of suspense and very well played end credits. G.Ripstein and T. Roth made it.

Prins, Directed by Sam de Jong 

Programmed in the Generation 14 plus section, but got also well accepted by the older (20+) audience. Here more from Sam De Jong, hope to see more from him soon.

The Forbidden Room, Directed by Guy Maddin

Guy Maddin Enjoys doing experiMENTAL projects currently, unfortunately not everyone in the audience enjoyed watching the over 2 hours long Forbidden Room.

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The Two Faces of January (in February)

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A film-noir like modern thriller filmed in great locations. This is another film adaptation of a Patricia Highsmith novel.

“Nypmhomaniac” [Vol.1] Director’s Cut ; Berlinale – late – short report

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Not having seen the theatrical cut before attending the Directors Cut’s screening was not a bad thing. The ~40 minutes longer version seems alright and I haven’t found anything I would want to get rid of. The movie itself is something we don’t experience in cinema a lot, but isn’t that what a good cinema is about: showing or doing things that haven’t been done before…

The Limits of Control

Berlinale’s Plot summary:

Ronah works as a sexual surrogate, teaching inhibited men what they fear most: intimacy. Her clients are referred to her by a psychotherapist. She and one of their number casually make the bed where they will sleep together; later on she lets him show her his new business idea on his laptop as if they were best friends. Such scenes are interspersed with hotel hallways, claustrophobic shots of Manhattan’s urban canyons, hassles with workmen, cries for help from Ronah’s brother she chooses to ignore, even as he tells her that their mother has disappeared. It is impossible to identify when exactly she loses control. She’s clearly not been able to get a handle on her new, auto-aggressive client Johnny with his soft voice, his intelligence, his occasional mocking remarks. She starts to fall in love with him instead. Without any trace of voyeurism, Anja Marquardt’s impressively complex, stylistically precocious directorial debut observes how the line between professional and private intimacy becomes gradually blurred.